Raşel Meseri

Raşel Meseri is a writer based in Izmir, Turkey. She published seven children books and one novel (Köpekbalıklarının Kayıp Şarkıları, Delidolu, 2018). She is the co-editor of Being Jewish in Turkey: A Dictionary of Experiences (Iletisim, 2017). Some of her theater plays are put on stage in Izmir and Istanbul. She also makes documentaries and short films, including Izmir Sea Children (2007) and Jewish Family Houses: Kortejos (2010).

Being Jewish in Turkey: A Dictionary of Experiences, ed. Raşel Meseri & Aylin Kuryel

Being Jewish in Turkey: A Dictionary of Experiences is published in November 2017 from Iletisim Press, Turkey, edited by Raşel Meseri and Aylin Kuryel. It is a collection of short accounts of experiences related to being Jewish in Turkey, written by Jewish and non-Jewish people, including family histories, historical traumas, discrimination stories, the use of Ladino language, stories of immigration to Israel and back to Turkey, Jewish and non-Jewish encounters, the relationship between different Jewish populations such as Sephardic, Ashkenazi and Romaniote Jews, almost forgotten songs, food and everyday traditions, daily life in different cities, stereotypes about Jews, among others. There are more than 300 short entries, put together in the form of a dictionary, written by 71 people. It provides an overview of being Jewish in Turkey through emotional, playful and strong stories, revealing how personal stories are intertwined with history and politics. The book is appealing to the general reader who is interested in Jewish and minority cultures in the world, with its accessible and fluent style based on story-telling. Putting forward a novel genre, “experience dictionary”, and shedding light on historical and cultural codes, it can also be a source for academic and non-academic researches on the subject.

Aylin Kuryel

Aylin Kuryel completed her PhD at the University of Amsterdam and is currently teaching at Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis (ASCA). She is the co-editor of Cultural Activism: Practices, Dilemmas and Possibilities (Rodopi, 2010) and Aesthetics and Resistance in the Age of Global Uprisings (Iletisim, 2015) and Being Jewish in Turkey: A Dictionary of Experiences (Iletisim, 2017). She has been involved in art projects/exhibitions and has completed documentaries and short movies.

Being Jewish in Turkey: A Dictionary of Experiences, ed. Raşel Meseri & Aylin Kuryel

Being Jewish in Turkey: A Dictionary of Experiences is published in November 2017 from Iletisim Press, Turkey, edited by Raşel Meseri and Aylin Kuryel. It is a collection of short accounts of experiences related to being Jewish in Turkey, written by Jewish and non-Jewish people, including family histories, historical traumas, discrimination stories, the use of Ladino language, stories of immigration to Israel and back to Turkey, Jewish and non-Jewish encounters, the relationship between different Jewish populations such as Sephardic, Ashkenazi and Romaniote Jews, almost forgotten songs, food and everyday traditions, daily life in different cities, stereotypes about Jews, among others. There are more than 300 short entries, put together in the form of a dictionary, written by 71 people. It provides an overview of being Jewish in Turkey through emotional, playful and strong stories, revealing how personal stories are intertwined with history and politics. The book is appealing to the general reader who is interested in Jewish and minority cultures in the world, with its accessible and fluent style based on story-telling. Putting forward a novel genre, “experience dictionary”, and shedding light on historical and cultural codes, it can also be a source for academic and non-academic researches on the subject.

Zeyno Pekünlü

Zeyno Pekünlü is an artist born in Izmir, 1980 and lives in Istanbul. She has graduated from the Painting Department of Mimar Sinan University, Istanbul and continued her education with master and PhD in the same university. She has also completed a second Master in Artistic Production and Research in University of Barcelona. Possibilities of collectivity, and especially of collective knowledge production, occupy a crucial space in her artistic and activist engagements. She is also part of several collectives such as A Place on Earth, a self-organized solidarity space for white-collar and freelance workers and Istanbul Solidarity Academy and part of the editorial collectives of the culture and politics journals Express and RedThread.

zeynopekunlu.blogspot.com

C.M Kosemen

C. M. Kosemen is an artist and independent researcher born in Ankara, Turkey. He studied at Cornell University, Istanbul’s Sabancı University and holds a Masters’ degree from London’s Goldsmiths College in Documentary Film and Media Studies.

Kosemen’s areas of interest include surreal art, Mediterranean history, palaeontology, evolution, zoology and visual culture.

As an artist, Kosemen is affiliated with the Empire Project Gallery of Istanbul. His art has been displayed in exhibits in Catania, Vienna, Ulcinj, Istanbul, Ankara, London and Tel Aviv.

As a researcher, Kosemen’s book credits include Osman Hasan and the Tombstone Photographs of the Dönmes, from Libra Books of Istanbul. Copies of this book have been purchased by leading universities and research institutes of the world. It has won the 2016 Eduard-Duckesz History Prize.

Kosemen’s other book credits include All Yesterdays: Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric Animals, and the Cryptozoologion, the Biology, Evolution and Mythology of Hidden Animals from Irregular Books of London.

Kosemen was also an editor for Benetton’s Colors magazine and worked in various advertising agencies.

www.cmkosemen.com
instagram.com/cmkosemen

Iosif Vaena

Iosif Vaena is a pharmacist,and in his free time he collects Jewish tombstones from the gulf of Thermaikos. He hopes that one day he will find out who threw them out there.

Gil Hochberg

Gil Hochberg is Ransford Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature, and Middle East Studies at Columbia University. Her research focuses on the intersections among psychoanalysis, postcolonial theory, nationalism, gender and sexuality. She has published essays on a wide range of issues including: Francophone North African literature, Palestinian literature, the modern Levant, gender and nationalism, cultural memory and immigration, memory and gender, Hebrew Literature, Israeli and Palestinian Cinema, Mediterraneanism, Trauma and Narrative. Her first book, In Spite of Partition: Jews, Arabs, and the Limits of Separatist Imagination (Princeton University Press, 2007), examines the complex relationship between the signifiers “Arab” and “Jew” in contemporary Jewish and Arab literatures. Her most recent book, Visual Occupations: Vision and Visibility in a Conflict Zone (Duke University Press, 2015), is a study of the visual politics of the Israeli-Palestinian. She is currently writing a book on art, archives and the production of historical knowledge.

Savas Michael-Matsas

Born in Athens in 1947. He studied and took his degree in Medicine in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Athens (1965-1971). Post-graduate studies in Radiology and Oncology in Paris, where he made also studies in Philosophy, History and Political Economy (1971-1974).He published the last 30 years in Greek and international theoretical journals many articles and essays on philosophy, political economy, Jewish studies, history and literary theory based on a non dogmatic Marxism. Active in the international Marxist movement from 1970.

He is teaching post-graduate courses of philosophy and cultural studies in the Communication and Mass Media Department of the National University of Athens. Member of the Editorial Board of the theoretical journals Critique (Editor Pr. Hillel Ticktin, University of Glasgow), and Alternativi (Editor Pr. Alexander Buzghalin, Moscow State University)

Author of books of essays (in Greek):The Greek poet Solomos and Hegel (Leon, 1990), The “Great Eastern” of Andreas Embiricos (Agra 1995), Forms of the Messianic (Agra 1999), Forms of Wandering (Agra, 2004), Homo Poeticus( Agra 2006), Golem or on the Subject and other Ghosts (Agra, 2010), The Horror of a Parody — Three Lectures on the Nazi ‘Golden Dawn’ (Agra 2013), Musica ex nihilo( Agra 2013), Homo Liber (Agra 2016).Essays translated into English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Turkish.

Ayse Cavdar

Ayse Cavdar graduated from Ankara University, Journalism Dept. Received a Masters’ degree in history, from Bogazici University.  Completed her Ph.D. thesis entitled “the Loss of Modesty: The Adventure of Muslim Family from Neighborhood to Gated Community” at the European University of Viadrina, in 2014 (supported by Global Prayers Project initiated by MetroZones). Worked for Helsinki Citizens Assembly’s project entitled Citizens Network for Peace, Reconciliation and Human Security in Western Balkans and Turkey. She served as a visiting scholar at the Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies, Philipps Universiy, Marburg, in 2016. She is recently a postdoc fellow in Käte Hamburger Kolleg/Center for Global Cooperation Research, in Duisburg. She co-edited (with Volkan Aytar) Media and Security Sector Oversight, Limits, and Possibilities, TESEV, 2009; (with Pelin Tan), The State of Exception in an Exceptional City, Sel Yayinlari, 2013.

Julian Reid

Julian Reid is Chair and Professor of International Relations at the University of Lapland, the northernmost university in the European Union, on the edge of the Arctic Circle, where he has lived since 2007. Born and raised in the United Kingdom, Reid taught previously at the Universities of London (SOAS and King’s College) and Sussex. He was Benjamin Meaker Visiting Professor at the University of Bristol in 2014. This autumn he is Visiting Research Fellow at Virginia Tech. His most recent book is The Neoliberal Subject: Resilience, Adaptivity and Vulnerability (co-authored with David Chandler).

Romm Lewkowicz

Romm Lewkowicz is a New York based anthropologist, migrant rights’ activist and a dramaturg. He is doctoral candidate at the Anthropology Department of CUNY’s Graduate Center, and a teaching fellow at Hunter College. In 2018, he will serve as a Max Planck fellow at the University of Leipzig. At present, he is in Chios (Greece), conducting fieldwork for his doctoral dissertation titled Documenting the undocumented: Experimenting the Future of Europe at the EU’s Biometric Refugee Archive. The research is an anthropological study of EURODAC (the EU’s biometric database for asylum seekers and “irregular migrants”), looking at how the refugee body has been serving as a laboratory for experimentation in biometric surveillance.

Lewkowicz has held various research positions in migrant rights NGO’s around the world, including the Hotline for Refugees and Migrants and the African Refugee Development Center (Tel Aviv), Detention Action (London) and Asylos – Research for Asylum (Brussels). Since 2013, Lewkowicz has been collaborating with the Berlin based director Ariel Efraim Ashbel, supervising the research and concept conception for the shows ALL WHITE PEOPLE LOOK THE SAME TO ME (2013) and The Empire Strikes Back (2015).  Their next show Do the Right Thing, which explores the legacy of Bauhaus and its bearing on the entanglement of action ethics and materiality, is funded by Kulturstiftung Des Bundes as part of its Bauhaus Today series marking the Bauhaus school’s 100th anniversary. Like their previous collaborations, the show would premiere at the Hebbel Am Ufer theater (HAU) in Berlin.